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By Alexander Pritsky, DMD Fresno Dental Implants and Periodontics
April 07, 2022
Category: Dental/Oral Care
Tags: Untagged

Dental flossing is the act of removing food debris and deposits stuck between the teeth with a thin cord known as floss. Flossing can help to prevent gum disease. Your family dentist, Dr. Alexander Pritsky of Fresno Dental Implant Center and Periodontics in Fresno, CA, can advise you on how to incorporate flossing into your oral hygiene routine. We also provide all advanced family dentistry services.

Why should I floss?

Brushing alone can't remove food debris and deposits from all the teeth. Flossing cleans those surfaces which your toothbrush can't reach. It is vital to clean the food debris to prevent plaque from accumulating because it will harden and become tartar with time. Plaque and tartar contain bacteria that cause cavities, gum disease, and bad breath. Your family dentists recommend flossing at least once a day to keep your teeth and gums healthy and clean. You may experience some bleeding from the gums initially, but with daily use, it will stop. If there is severe bleeding, it could be a sign of gum disease for which you have to visit your dentist. Floss is available in different flavors and varieties, you can choose the one that suits your needs. Even if you have braces, it should not stop you from flossing your teeth regularly.

Method of flossing

Take about 18 inches of floss and wound it around the middle finger of each hand. Keep the floss between the thumb and forefingers, and gently move it up and down between the teeth. Don't insert the floss below the gumline. You need to floss between all the teeth including those in the back.

For more information, book an appointment with our family dentist, Dr. Alexander Pritsky of Fresno Dental Implant Center and Periodontics in Fresno, CA, by calling (559) 298-3900 today.

By Alexander Pritsky, DMD Fresno Dental Implants and Periodontics
March 07, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Dental Implants  

If you are missing a tooth you may be curious about what options you have when it comes to restoring your smile. Dental implants are in many ways the best solution to tooth loss. They are meant to be a final and complete restoration of a missing tooth. This treatment will last much longer and will be stronger than other options. Learn more about dental implants in Fresno, CA, from Dr. Alexander Pritsky.

Better Support

The key difference between dental implants and other methods of restoration, such as bridges and dentures, has to do with the way in which they are supported. Dental bridges depend on adjacent teeth to serve as support for the tooth they are replacing. To accomplish this, these healthy teeth need to be reshaped so that a crown can be attached to them, then they will hold your new tooth in place.

Dentures depend on suction as their main method of support. These require a proper fit to perform at their best. So many of the common complaints people have regarding dentures are due to this factor. A dental implant is supported in a very similar way to your natural teeth. They use a titanium post that is permanently implanted onto the bone of your jaw, and it's onto this that your new tooth will be attached.

Dental Implants in Fresno, CA

One downside to dental implants is that they do require a longer initial investment of time, as the implanted post can take months to heal and fuse with the jaw bone. Implants can last a lifetime with proper care, and they don't need any special treatment when it comes to hygiene or diet, although good dental habits remain key to maintaining your smile.

If you're ready to restore a single missing tooth or a complete smile, find out if you're a candidate for dental implants. Call (559) 298-3900 to schedule a consultation in Fresno, CA, from Dr. Pritsky.

By Alexander Pritsky, DMD Fresno Dental Implants and Periodontics
January 17, 2022
Category: Oral Health
HowaToothCausedHannahBronfmansMysteryAilments

Hannah Bronfman, well-known DJ and founder of the health and beauty website HBFIT.com, took a tumble while biking a few years ago. After the initial pain and bruising subsided, all seemed well—until she started experiencing headaches, fatigue and unexplained weight gain. Her doctors finally located the source—a serious infection emanating from a tooth injured during the accident.

It's easy to think of the human body as a loose confederation of organs and tissues that by and large keep their problems to themselves. But we'd do better to consider the body as an organic whole—and that a seemingly isolated condition may actually disrupt other aspects of our health.

That can be the case with oral infections triggered by tooth decay or gum disease, or from trauma as in Bronfman's case. These infections, which can inflict severe damage on teeth and gums, may also contribute to health issues beyond the mouth. They can even worsen serious, life-threatening conditions like heart disease.

The bacteria that cause both tooth decay and gum disease could be the mechanism for these extended problems. It's possible for bacteria active during an oral infection to migrate to other parts of the body through the bloodstream. If that happens, they can spread infection elsewhere, as it appears happened with Bronfman.

But perhaps the more common way for a dental disease to impact general health is through chronic inflammation. Initially, this defensive response by the body is a good thing—it serves to isolate diseased or injured tissues from healthier tissues. But if it becomes chronic, inflammation can cause its own share of damage.

The inflammation associated with gum disease can lead to weakened gum tissues that lose their attachment to teeth. But clinical research over the last few years also points to another possibility—that periodontal inflammation could worsen the inflammation associated with diseases like heart disease, diabetes or arthritis.

Because of this potential harm not only to your teeth and gums but also to the rest of your body, you shouldn't take an oral injury or infection lightly. If you've had an accident involving your mouth, see your dentist as soon as possible for a complete examination. You should also make an appointment if you notice signs of infection like swollen or bleeding gums.

Prompt dental treatment can help you minimize potential damage to your teeth and gums. It could also protect the rest of your health.

If you would like more information about the effects of dental problems on the rest of the body, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Link Between Heart and Gum Diseases.”

By Alexander Pritsky, DMD Fresno Dental Implants and Periodontics
January 07, 2022
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
5TipsForKeepingYourToothEnamelHealthy

You know what people say: "Protect your tooth enamel, and it will protect your teeth." Then again, maybe you've never heard anyone say that—but it's still true. Super strong enamel protects teeth from oral threats that have the potential to do them in.

Unfortunately, holding the title of "Hardest substance in the human body" doesn't make enamel indestructible. It's especially threatened by oral acid, which can soften its mineral content and lead to erosion.

That doesn't have to happen. Here are 5 things you can do to protect your enamel—and your teeth.

Don't brush too often. Brushing is essential for removing bacterial plaque, the main cause for dental disease. But more isn't always good—brushing too frequently can wear down enamel (and damage your gums, too). So, limit daily brushing to no more than twice a day.

Don't brush too soon. Oral acid normally peaks at mealtime, which can put your enamel into a softer than normal state. No worries, though, because saliva neutralizes acid within about an hour. But brushing before saliva finishes rebuffering could cause tiny bits of softened enamel to flake off—so, wait an hour after eating to brush.

Stop eating—right before turning in for the night, that is. Because saliva flow drops significantly during sleep, the decreased saliva may struggle to buffer acid from that late night snack. To avoid this situation, end your eating or snacking at least an hour before bedtime.

Increase your calcium. This essential mineral that helps us maintain strong bones and teeth can also help our enamel remineralize faster after acid contact. Be sure, then, to include calcium-rich foods and calcium-fortified beverages in your diet.

Limit acidic beverages. Many sodas, sports and energy drinks are high in acid, which can skew your mouth's normal pH. Go with low-acidic beverages like milk or water, or limit acidic drinks to mealtimes when saliva flows more freely. Also, consider using a straw while drinking acidic beverages to lessen their contact with teeth.

Remember, enamel isn't a renewable resource—once it's gone, it's gone. Take care of your enamel, then, so it will continue to take care of you!

If you would like more information on caring for your tooth enamel, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “6 Tips to Help Prevent the Erosion of Tooth Enamel.”

By Alexander Pritsky, DMD Fresno Dental Implants and Periodontics
December 28, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
RecurringSinusInfectionsCouldBeaSignofToothDecay

It seems like every year you make at least one trip to the doctor for a sinus infection. You might blame it on allergies or a "bug" floating around, but it could be caused by something else: tooth decay.

We're referring to an advanced form of tooth decay, which has worked its way deep into the pulp and root canals of a tooth. And, it could have an impact on your sinuses if the tooth in question is a premolar or molar in the back of the upper jaw.

These particular teeth are located just under the maxillary sinus, a large, open space behind your cheek bones. In some people, these teeth's roots can extend quite close to the sinus floor, or may even extend through it.

It's thus possible for an infection in such a tooth to spread from the tip of the roots into the maxillary sinus. Unbeknownst to you, the infection could fester within the tooth for years, occasionally touching off a sinus infection.

Treating with antibiotics may relieve the sinus infection, but it won't reach the bacteria churning away inside the tooth, the ultimate cause for the infection. Until you address the decay within the tooth, you could keep getting the occasional sinus infection.

Fortunately, we can usually treat this interior tooth decay with a tried and true method called root canal therapy. Known simply as a "root canal," this procedure involves drilling a hole into the tooth to access the infected tissue in the pulp and root canals. After removing the diseased tissue and disinfecting the empty spaces, we fill the pulp and root canals and then seal and crown the tooth to prevent future infection.

Because sinus infections could be a sign of a decayed tooth, it's not a bad idea to see a dentist or endodontist (root canal specialist) if you're having them frequently. Treating it can restore the tooth to health—and maybe put a stop to those recurring sinus infections.

If you would like more information on the connection between tooth decay and sinus problems, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sinusitis and Tooth Infections.”





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